ESTABLISHING TEAM TRUST

ESTABLISHING TEAM TRUST

ESTABLISHING TEAM TRUST

The most essential feature of successful teamwork is trust. Teams thrive on mutual trust, so it must be established early in the life of a team. Promote mutual trust through delegation, openness of conduct and communication, and a free exchange of ideas. 

Learning to Delegate

Delegation takes two forms: delegation of tasks and of authority. Break down each project into single tasks or goals, and allocate them to individual team members.  Then leave them alone, intervening only if it appears that a goal will not be achieved. To delegate authority, share your power both with the team, consulting members on all issues, and with individuals, giving them full authority if their area of expertise is involved. Ask members to keep you informed of progress – and let them go on with it.

Promoting Openness

Teamwork and secrecy cannot live together, so a leader who is not open with team members will not get the best of their potential. Arrange regular formal meetings to serve as avenues to openness. As people get to know one another better, they will relax and start to feel at ease with the team – and this will allow a sense of loyalty and cohesion to develop.  Try to allow the team full access (where appropriate) to all facts and figures, agendas, and minutes relevant to their overall responsibilities for the project, but bear in mind that there will be times when you may have to maintain confidentiality.

Encouraging Ideas

 People have far more potential for creating ideas when working as a team than they do individually. Encourage the open discussion of ideas, and make sure that all suggestions are heard with respect. If an idea needs to be discounted, do so with tact, and always give valid reasons for the rejection.  Alert team members to the expertise available within the group, and always promote the open discussion of ideas relevant to the objectives.

RECOGNIZING THE CHARACTER TYPES WHEN DELEGATING

CAN DO – WILL DO

The ideal delegate, happy to accept full responsibility for his specific task  and also happy to consult others, acting on the advice that is given

WILL DO – CAN’T DO

Initially, the delegate may require encouragement and proper training to overcome inexperience before taking responsibility for the allotted task.

CAN DO – WON’T DO

A reluctance to learn or accept other opinions may mean that an individual is simply not a team-player, and therefore not a strong delegate.

CANT DO – WON’T DO

Unless this person’s lack of motivation and ability can be overcome, delegation will fail, and he may have to be moved to another environment.

 

TIPS

  1. Keep tasks to yourself only if you know that no-one else can do them.
  2. Do not delegate any unnecessary work – scrap it.
  3. Give your team the freedom to make its own decisions.
  4. Encourage positive contributions from team members.

 

If you find this article useful, please share and subscribe to our newsletter.

 

…………………………………………………………

,